Evolution of the Lancer Evolution

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Lancer EvolutionThe Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution (colloquially known as the "Evo") is the Mitsubishi's flagship sports car. There have been ten official versions to date, and the designation of each model is most commonly a roman numeral. All of them share a two litre, turbocharged engine and four-wheel drive system. Evolution models prior to version VII were the homologation models for Mitsubishi's efforts in the World Rally Championship. In order to follow these rules, the Evolution was based on the same unibody as the Lancer, which only changed with the introduction of the Evo X.

Evolution models prior to version V were the officially approved models for Mitsubishi’s efforts in the World Rally Championship’s Group A class and SCCA Pro Rally Championship. In order to follow these rules, the Evolution is based on the same platform as the Lancer, but is much more powerful and the only major part in common between the Evo and the Lancer is the unibody. To meet Group A and N rules a minimum number of cars had to be produced, forming the basis of the car to be raced / rallied. Ten street versions of the Evolution have been produced from 1993 up to today. Evolution versions VI - X did not need to meet WRC homologation requirements.

The legendary Evo 4G63 2L turbo engineThe Evo was originally intended only for Japanese markets but demand on the ’grey import’ market led the Evolution series to be offered through limited type-approval in Australia with the EVO VI in 1999 in response to Subaru's decision to import limited numbers of the Subaru Impreza WRX STi in the same year. Australia missed out on the EVO VII, however resumed limited imports with the EVO VIII via Ralliart and then from the EVO IX fully imported the car via normal channels.

Here in Australia models not officially imported by Mitsubishi have since been approved for low volume private import by specialised importers. Most common is the EVO VII, and VIIIMR. It should be noted that all (Japanese) EVO model are designed to run on 100 Ron fuel and any import model is required to have its ECU retuned to suit local fuels (this is often overlooked).

Until the Exo X, all Japanese spec cars were limited by a gentlema's agreement to advertise no more than 206kw, a self imposed limit, a mark already reached by Evolution IV. Therefore, each subsequent version has unofficially evolved above the advertised power figures, with the Japanese-spec Evolution IX reaching a real power output of around 236kw. Various versions available in other markets, particularly the UK, have official power outputs up to 302kw, whereas the Australian spec Evo VIII only came with 195kw and the Evo IX with 206kw, coincidentally the exact same power figure as the Australia spec STis at the time.

In 2008, the latest generation Lancer Evolution X was launched worldwide, and featured an all-new 217 kW inline four-cylinder turbocharged engine and a full-time all wheel drive powertrain.

 


Lancer Evolution I

Evolution I (1992)

Flush with success from its Galant VR-4 and hungry for WRC victory, Mitsubishi determined in 1990 that further success would require a new platform. To that end, Mitsubishi engineers started with VR-4’s proven drivetrain and shoehorned it into the lighter, smaller Lancer chassis and the Evolution I was born.

However, competition in WRC’s Group A and N required the homologation of 2,500 production models. No problem. Offered in GSR and RS flavours, 5,000 EVO Is were snapped up between September 1992 and December 1993. Mitsubishi’s intent behind the lightweight RS model was to provide a good starting point for building a club-level rally car.

The Evolution I was introduced in 1992 to compete in the World Rally Championship. It used the 2.0 L turbocharged DOHC engine and 4WD drivetrain from the original Galant VR-4 in a Lancer chassis, and was sold in GSR and RS models. The latter was a stripped-down club racing version that lacked power windows and seats, anti-lock brakes, a rear wiper, and had steel wheels to save approximately 70kg less than the 1238kg GSR, while the former came with all of the conveniences of a typical street car. It came with Mitsubishi’s 4G63 engine producing 182kw at 6000 rpm and 309Nm at 3000 rpm, along with all wheel drive which would become a trademark on all Evo models. 5,000 Evo Is were sold between 1992 and 1993. Evo I was using the CD9A frame.


Lancer Evolution II

Evolution II (1993)

The successful Evo I was changed in December of 1993, and the Lancer Evolution II, built from that month to January 1995, was focused primarily on improving the handling of the EVO I. Though the same fundamental chassis was used in Evolutions I-III, EVO II brought a 10 mm increase in wheelbase accomplished by moving the front wheels forward. Vehicle track was increased at both ends to accommodate larger tires (now 205/60-15, up from 195/55-15), while longer control arms in front and a revised sway-bar mounting arrangement enhanced steering response. Aerodynamic tweaks like a front air dam and an additional rear spoiler support improved vehicle stability at higher speeds.

Mitsubishi intended to improve power output with each Evolution, and EVO II started the trend. Boost pressure was increased, higher-lift cams were fitted, and detail changes to the exhaust reduced backpressure. Power of the 4G63 was now up to 188kw, while torque remained unchanged at 309Nm, propelling a vehicle weight of 1248kg for GSR models and 1180kg for RS models.

Also, Mitsubishi decided to change the frame this year to CE9A, a spin off the CD9A used in the previous edition.


Lancer Evolution III

Evolution III (1995)

Speeds on tarmac stages were getting higher, so reducing lift and improving cooling performance became priorities in Evolution III. A larger rear wing, a front airdam with brake cooling vents, and rocker panel extensions were fitted and power was increased again.

It arrived in January 1995 and this time the 5000 strong production run was brought up more quickly than the Evo II. The Evo III looked more serious, with it’s new nose moulding (to channel air better to the radiator, intercooler, and brakes). New side skirts and rear corners, while the rear wing had grown again to reduce lift. Under the vented aluminium bonnet a new TDO5-16G6-7 Turbo, new exhaust system and increased compression brought another 7kw power rise, Torque output was unaltered, apart from a higher final drive ratio. Both GSR and RS still used the same 5speed gearbox. Interior tweaks were limited to a new Momo steering wheel (GSR only) and new fabric on the Evo 2 type Recaros. This model still used the same frame (CE9A) as the EVO II.

The Evolution III GSR weighed 1260 kg while the RS model weighed 1190 kg. The car's 4G63T engine had a displacement of 1997 cc and provided 201 kW at 6250 rpm and 309Nm of torque at 3000 rpm.

Selling 7,000 examples from January 1995 to August 1996, Evolution III was the best-selling EVO to that date.


Lancer Evolution IV

Evolution IV (1996)

The Lancer platform was completely changed in 1996, and along with it the Evo, which had become extremely popular throughout the world.

The engine and transaxle was rotated 180° to better balance the weight and eliminate torque steer. There were still two versions available, the RS and GSR, with the RS version produced as a competition car with a limited-slip front differential and a friction type LSD at the rear. It also came with GLX seats and 16" steel wheels as these were items that would be replaced by anyone entering the car into competition events.

The RS also had wind up windows, no air conditioning-just heater, and a few extra brace bars to strengthen the chassis, one behind the front grill and the other across the boot floor. The RS also had factory thinner body panels and thinner glass!

Active Yaw ControlThe GSR and the RS shared a new twin scroll turbocharger which helped to increase power to 206kw at 6500 rpm and 352Nm of torque at 3000 rpm.

Mitsubishi’s new Active YAW control appeared as a factory option on the GSR model, which used steering, throttle input sensors and G sensors to computer-hydraulically controlled torque split individually to the rear wheels and as a result the 10,000 Evo IVs produced all sold quickly.

The Evo IV can be distinguished by its two large foglights on the front bumper, and the newly designed tail lights on the rear, which became a standard design to Evo VI, which would become yet another trademark of the Evolution series.

This new generation was slightly heavier than previous Evos (1260kg for the RS and 1350kg for the GSR) - the GSR in particular due to the added technology systems- but to counter this the car produced even more power.

This was the only model year to use the CN9A as its frame.

 


Lancer Evolution V

Evolution V (1997)

In 1997, the WRC created a new class, "World Rally Car", and while these cars still had to abide by Group A standards, they did not have to meet homologation rules. Mitsubishi redesigned the Evo IV with this in mind and introduced the Evo V in January of 1998.

Many aspects of the car were changed such as: The interior was upgraded in the GSR version with a better class of Recaro seat. The body kit had flared arches at the front and rear and a new aluminium rear spoiler relaced the IV FRP version and gave an adjustable angle of attack to alter rear down force. The track was widened by 10 mm, the wheel offset changed from ET45 to ET38 along with the wheel diameter which rose from 16" to 17" to accommodate Brembo brakes which were added to enhance braking. In addition the brake master cylinder bore increased by 0.3 mm. The engine was strengthened in a few areas and the cam duration was increased. The pistons were lighter with a smaller skirt area. 510CC injectors were replaced with 560CC injectors for better engine reliability due to more electrical "headroom" and the ECU was changed to include a flash ROM.

Further more, the turbocharger was again improved. Torque was increased to 373Nm at 3000 rpm. Power officially stayed the same, at 206kw as agreed by Japan’s automotive gentlemen’s agreement, but reputable sources claim horsepower was actually somewhat higher. Frame CP9A was used on the Evo V.

Despite the changes, total weight increased only 10 kg over the EVO IV. With an aggressive new rear wing, larger hood vents for improving radiator airflow, a deeper front chin spoiler, and enormous cooling vents in the bumper, the EVO V looked like a rolling street fight.


Lancer Evolution VI

Evolution VI (1999)

The Evo VI’s changes mainly focused on cooling and engine durability. It received a larger intercooler, larger oil cooler, and new pistons, along with a titanium-aluminide turbine wheel for the RS model, which was a first in a production car. Also, the Evo VI received new bodywork yet again, with the most easily spotted change in the front bumper where the huge foglights were reduced in size and moved to the corners for better airflow. A new model was added to the GSR and RS lineup; known as the RS2, it was an RS with a few of the GSR’s options. Another limited-edition RS was known as the RS Sprint, and was tuned by Ralliart to be lighter and more powerful with 246kw.

Yet another special edition Evo VI was also released in 1999: the Tommi Makinen edition (named after Finnish rally driver Tommi Makinen that had won Mitsubishi numerous WRC drivers championships) which was also known as the EVO 6.5. It featured Red/Black Recaro seats (with emmbosed T. Makinen logo), 17" ENKEI white wheels, a leather MOMO steering wheel and shift knob, a titanium turbine that spooled up quicker, front upper strut brace, lowered with tarmac stages in mind, a quicker lock to lock and amongst others colours, came in an exclusive shade of red with special decals, replicating Tommi Makinen’s rally car’s colour scheme.

Evo VI TME - first Evo officially imported into AustraliaAnother trim level was introduced, RS2, combining the RS-only hardware specification with a modicum of the GSR’s niceties. The frame used for the EVO VI was CP9A on both the TME and standard edtions.

The Evo VI saw the first official import of the Evo into Australia, with 100 units of the TME edition imported via Mitsubishi's performance arm, Ralliart.  Featuring all the fruit of the regular JDM models with 206kw and 373Nm, the Evo VI nevertheless sold slowly due to its high AUD $80K price tag, some $20K higher than the cost of its arch rival, the Subaru Impreza WRX STi.

MRT Power Kits

MRT Power Kits

As with the Subaru WRX and STI, the Evolution VI comes with the ability to upgrade the factory ECU using EcuTeK software, negating the requirement to replace it with an aftermarket unit when chasing significant power increases. The ability to tune the factory ECU also allows direct access to factory calibration data, and the ability to use most of the default factory settings whilst just changing those required. This model also benefits greatly from a better flowing mandrel exhaust from the turbo back, larger intercooler and air intake modifications.

There are no Power Kits for the Evolution VI, however MRT have done heaps of work on this model and are able to put together a package to suit your needs.

Download: Contact details regarding more info for the Evolution VI


Lancer Evolution VII

Evolution VII (2001)

In 2001, Mitsubishi decided to race in the WRC class instead of the Group A class, and thus did not need to follow homologation rules, wowever the model was still homologated for Group N. The Evo VII was based on the larger Lancer Cedia platform and as a result gained more weight over the Evo VI, but made up for this with multiple important chassis tweaks. The biggest change was the addition of an active center differential and a more effective limited-slip differential, while a front helical limited-slip differential was added. Torque was increased again to 385Nm with engine tweaks that allowed greater airflow, and horsepower officially remained at 206kw. Despite its civilian appearance, the Evolution VII could outrun many more expensive cars (such as the Ferrari 360 Modena).

Most significant was the introduction of an active center differential (ACD), an all-new electro-hydraulically controlled multiplate clutch-type limited-slip differential with three times the binding capacity of the viscous unit used in the EVO VI. Active Yaw Control (AYC) still regulated torque split in the rear differential, while a torque-sensing helical limited-slip was fitted to the front. With input from a host of sensors, ACD and AYC were both regulated by a single dedicated control unit. Together, ACD and AYC improved turn-in and reduced understeer more seamlessly, allowing controlled tail-out hooliganism and scalpel-sharp steering response.

Evo VII Component View

Structural reinforcements to the donor Cedia chassis increased flexural rigidity by 50 percent by adding thicker sheetmetal and bracing in high-load regions, seam-welding in the B-pillars and front chassis section, and more than 200 additional spot welds in the door apertures. Weight-saving measures like thinner glass, forged aluminum suspension pieces, aluminum front fenders, thinner sheetmetal in the roof panel, a magnesium cam cover, and hollow camshafts kept the total vehicle weight increase to about 90 pounds over the EVO VI.

At 206kw, quoted power remained unchanged though peak torque increased to 385Nm, this time by way of reworked intake ports, a less-restrictive intake manifold, and a smaller twin-scroll turbine housing (reduced from 10.5 to 9.8 cm2). Paired with a 20mm larger intercooler and a lower-backpressure exhaust, the sauce was spread over a broader range of engine speeds than ever before. Overall, the VII was an even more potent performer-if a more civilized one-than the VI.

Evo VII RearThe introduction of the Evolution VII also marked the first time an automatic drivetrain was included within the model lineup—the GT-A (JDM only). Seen as the 'gentlema's express' version of the visually similar VII GSR, the GT-A model was only produced in 2002 and had the following distinguishing interior and exterior specification: GT-A-only diamond cut finish 17-inch (430 mm) alloy wheels, clear rear light lenses and all-in-one style front headlights (later used on the Evolution VIII). The GT-A had the option of either no spoiler, the short spoiler (as later used on the Evolution VIII 260) or the thunderspoiler as used on the standard Evolution VII models. The most distinguishing feature was a smooth bonnet with no air-grills on it at all. Although offering inferior cooling capabilities, the bonnet was designed to give a cleaner line through the air with less air resistance at motorway speeds.

The frame used was frame:CT9A, which was used until the arrival of the Evo X.

The Evo VII was not sold officially in Australia, most likely due to the residual stock of the Evo VI still in showrooms due in turn to the high $80K price tag.

MRT Power Kits

MRT Power Kits

As with the Evolution VI, the Evolution VII comes with the ability to upgrade the factory ECU using EcuTeK software, negating the requirement to replace it with an aftermarket unit when chasing significant power increases. The ability to tune the factory ECU also allows direct access to factory calibration data, and the ability to use most of the default factory settings whilst just changing those required. This model also benefits greatly from a better flowing mandrel exhaust from the turbo back, larger intercooler and air intake modifications.

There are no Power Kits for the Evolution VI, however MRT have done some work on this model and are able to put together a package to suit your needs.

Download: Contact details regarding more info for the Evolution VII


Lancer Evolution VIII

Evolution VIII (2003)

The Evolution was changed again in 2003, this time sporting Super Active Yaw Control to handle traction and a 6-speed manual gearbox. It was available with 206kw in three trims: standard (GSR in Japan), RS (devoid of all excess components, such as the rear wing, trunk carpeting, interior map lights, power windows/doors, and radio) and MR, which came with a new vortex generator (a set of ridges above the rear window to improve aerodynamics). Both RS and MR Editions came with a revised limited-slip front differential.

The Lancer Evolution VIII MR uses slick-response Bilstein shocks for improved handling. The aluminum roof panel and other reductions in body weight have lowered the centre of gravity to realize more natural roll characteristics. Detail improvements have also been made to Mitsubishi’s own electronic all-wheel drive, to the ACD 5 + Super AYC 6 traction control and to the Sports ABS systems. The Lancer Evolution VIII displayed at the 2003 Tokyo Motor Show took the MR designation traditionally reserved for Mitsubishi Motors high-performance models and used first on the Galant GTO. Other parts on the MR include BBS alloy wheels, Recaro bucket seats, Brembo brakes, and a MOMO steering wheel

Evo VIII standard low rent interiorIn the United Kingdom, many special Evolutions were introduced, which included FQ320, FQ340, and FQ400 variants (FQ said jocularly to stand for ’Fucking Quick’). They each came with 320, 340, and 400 hp (239, 254, and 298 kW), respectively and all featured EcuTeK upgraded ECUs developed in collaboration with EcuTeK UK.

The FQ400, sold through Ralliart UK, produces 302.13 kW (405.2 hp), from its 2.0L 4G63 engine as the result of being specially modified by United Kingdom tuning firms Rampage, Owen Developments and Flow Race Engines. At 202.9 hp (151.3 kW) per litre, it has one of the highest specific output per litre of any roadcar engine. With a curb weight of around 3200 lb, it achieves a 0-60 in 3.5 seconds and a 0-100 in around 9 seconds, while costing about £47,000. BBC’s television series Top Gear demonstrated that the FQ-400 could easily keep up with a Lamborghini Murcielago around a test track. The Stig recorded a Top Gear Power Lap Times of 1 minute 24.8 seconds.

The Lancer Evolution VIII was once again officially imported into Australia, however the Australian spec car was detuned to 195kw (coincidentally the same as the Subaru WRX STi at the time) and also lacked the JDM 6-speed manual transmission, coming instead with the old 5 speed manual transmission. The Australian spec still included many goodies such AWD (all wheel drive) with S-AYC (Super Active Yaw Control) and ACD (Active Centre Differential), Brembo brakes with ABS and EBD, and a carbon fibre rear wing. Interior wise, the car was clearly based upon the entry level Lancer with a spartan interior including a basic A/C, rubbish stereo and no cruise control.

Initially only 100 units were imported via Ralliart for $61,000, however this time the cars proved to be so popular that an additional 100 units were also imported and sold quickly through dealers.

MRT Power Kits

MRT Power Kits

As with the Evolution VI and VII, the Evolution VIII comes with the ability to upgrade the factory ECU using EcuTeK software, negating the requirement to replace it with an aftermarket unit when chasing significant power increases. The ability to tune the factory ECU also allows direct access to factory calibration data, and the ability to use most of the default factory settings whilst just changing those required. This model also benefits greatly from a better flowing mandrel exhaust from the turbo back, larger intercooler and air intake modifications.

There are no Power Kits for the Evolution VIII, however MRT have done heaps of work on this model and are able to put together a package to suit your needs.

Download: Contact details regarding more info for the Evolution VIII


Lancer Evolution IX

Evolution IX (2006)

Mitsubishi introduced the 2006 Lancer Evolution IX at the 2005 New York International Auto Show. The JDS versio's 2.0L 4G63 engine got MIVEC technology (variable valve timing), boosting official power output to 213 kW and torque to 392Nm - however actual figures are significantly higher.

The Australian spec car saw power lifted from 195kw in the Evo VIII to 206kw for the Evo IX (again the exact same output as the MY06 Subaru Impreza WRX STi) whilst torque remained at 355Nm (still less than overseas models). Goodies such as S-AYC, ACD, Brembo brakes and that carbon fibre wing were retained from the previous model. Notable enhancements to the Evo IX were the 6 speed transmission, the introduction of Variable cam control with MIVEC technology, BBS alloy wheels, vortex roof generators, a more efficient air dam (the most noticeable feature are the two small oval ducts to cool the intercooler pipes) and new rear bumper with a diffuser undersurface to smooth out the airflow coming out of the car. Unlike other countries which were offered various model choices, Australia was only offered one standard model which was closest to the JDM and European GSR model.

Three trims were available for Japan, Asia and Europe. Although all models used the same 213 kW engine, the torque differed from one model to another. In Europe, like Australia, the Evolution IX was advertised to have 206kw. The GSR produced 400 Nm of torque, while the RS and GT produced 407Nm.

  • RS - "rally sport", revised 5-speed, aluminium roof, gauge pack, minimal interior, LSD and a titanium-magnesium turbine, left-hand drive option available.
  • GT - revised 5-speed, this is basically the RS mechanically, but with some of the GSR's features (mainly interior pieces).
  • GSR - 6-speed, Bilstein monotube shocks, aluminium roof, gauge pack, SAYC (Super Active Yaw Control), and double-din radio (this is roughly equivalent to the USDM MR).

In the United Kingdom, the Evolution IX used a different model scheme based on the car's horsepower. There were initially three models available: the FQ-300, FQ-320 and FQ-340 each with around 300, 320 and 340 bhp (254kw) respectively, and all once again using EcuTeK upgraded ECUs. An FQ-360 model was subsequently released as a successor to the Evolution VIII FQ-400. While the new FQ-360 produced less horsepower than its predecessor, it had more torque at 363 lb·ft (492Nm) at 3200 rpm - 8 lb·ft (11Nm) more than the FQ-400. All four models were designed to run on super unleaded petrol only.

  • FQ-300, 320, 340 - 6-speed, Bilstein monotube shocks, AYC (Active Yaw Control)
  • FQ-360 - 6-speed, Bilstein monotube shocks, AYC (Active Yaw Control), Ralliart Sports Meter Kit, carbon front splitter, Speedline alloy wheels

Four models were available in the US. All models used the same 286 hp (213 kW) engine. All models used a front and rear Limited Slip Differential, and an Active Center Differential.

  • Standard - revised 5-speed, standard model
  • RS - ralli sport, revised 5-speed, aluminium roof, gauge pack, minimal interior, also no radio
  • SE - Special Edition, aluminium roof/hood, and front fenders, split seven-spoke forged aluminium BBS wheels in "diamond black" finish, HID headlights with integrated fog lights, red-stitched Recaro seats
  • MR - 6-speed, Bilstein monotube shocks, split seven-spoke forged aluminium BBS wheels, aluminium roof, hood, and front fenders, gauge pack, HID headlights with integrated fog lights, vortex generator, and custom MR badging

Evo IX Rear Wing A 2,500-piece, limited edition Evolution IX station wagon was released in Japan soon after the sedan’s debut. It uses the back end of the Lancer Sportback wagon grafted onto the sedan. Two trim models will be introduced: the GT with a six-speed manual transmission and the GT-A with a 5-speed automatic. Other than the station wagon back end, redesigned seats, and some small chromed trim pieces, the car’s interior is the same as the sedan.

Mitsubishi also developed the Evolution MIEV, based on the Evolutions IX’s chassis but with 4 electric engines connected to the four wheels as a test bed for the Mitsubishi In-wheel Electric Vehicle (MIEV) next-generation electric vehicle. The in-wheel engines use a hollow doughnut construction to locate the rotor outside the stator unlike other electric motors where the rotor turns inside the stator. The result of this is a lighter engine which translates into lower unsprung weight in a system where the engines are mounted in the wheels. Each in-wheel engine produces a power output of 68hp, thus giving a massive combined output of 272 hp comparable to that of regular, gas powered Lancer Evolutions. The car subsequently competed in the Shikoku EV (Electric Vehicle) Rally 2005.

The Evo IX uses the CT9A frame.

MRT Power Kits

Whilst the Evo IX is a wonderfully performing and handling car straight from the showroom floor, other markets such as the UK can access factory enhanced models such as the FQ-360 which Australia misses out on.

The good news is that MRT has done heaps of work on the Evolution IX, largely due to the MRT Evo IX development car that was used to design awesome Power Kits to give the Australian market similar packages to the FQ models available in the UK. All Power Kits use EcuTeK, giving the ability to tune the factory ECU whilst also allowing direct access to factory calibration data, and the ability to use most of the default factory settings whilst just changing those required.

MRT offers two Power Kits using EcuTeK.

MRT Power Kits

 
  • XA kit: Consists of Type 1 EcuTek upgrade, 3" muffler and air intake modifications for a guaranteed 20kw power increase and up to 15% torque increase over standard.
  • XB kit: Consists of Type 1.5 EcuTek upgrade, full 3" exhaust system from the turbo and air intake modifications for a guaranteed 35kw power increase and up to 40% torque increase over standard.
  • For more power above "XB" levels, contact MRT for a custom package

Download: Full Power Kit Details for the Evolution IX

 


Lancer Evolution X

Evolution X (2008)

The Lancer Evolution X sedan features a newly designed 4B11T 2.0L turbocharged, all-aluminium inline 4 cylinder engine. The car has also a new full-time all-wheel drive system named S-AWC (Super All Wheel Control), an advanced version of Mitsubishi's AWC system used in previous generations. The S-AWC uses torque vectoring technology to send different amount of torque to any wheel at any given time.

The Evo X also features Mitsubishi's new sequential semi-automatic six speed Twin Clutch SST twin-clutch transmission with steering-mounted magnesium alloy shift paddles. A 5-speed manual gearbox is also available with Mitsubishi claiming that the 5 speed manual transmission has always been preferred in rallying and should be very refined, resulting in a more satisfying drive.

The Lancer Evolution X uses the next generation RISE safety body.

Lancer Evolution X S-AWC System

Japanese models

The engine is the 4B11-type 2.0 litre inline-4 turbo and produces 221kw at 6500 rpm and 422Nm at 3500 rpm. Aluminum is used in the roof panel, front fenders and the rear spoiler frame structure

The standard GSR model can be fitted with following packages:

  • High Performance Package - Bilstein single tube shock absorbers and Eibach coil springs, brembo 2-piece disc brakes, high performance tires with stiffer walls and better grip.
  • Stylish Exterior Package - Chrome finish for the front grille lattice and beltline molding, body colour-keyed fender vents, adds fog lamps.
  • Leather Combination Interior - The seats matches the color of the exterior.
  • Premium Package - All 3 above packages plus 18-inch (460 mm) BBS lightweight alloy wheels.

North American models

Engine produces 217kw at 6500rpm and 407Nm at 4400.

  • GSR - Same as base Japanese GSR. (available only with manual 5 speed)
  • MR - 6-speed TC-SST transmission. Suspension with Eibach springs and Bilstein struts. 18-inch BBS forged alloy wheels. Xenon High-Intensity Discharge (HID) headlamps. Color-keyed large rear spoiler. Leather and sueded seating. Electronic keyless entry and starting system. Steering wheel-mounted audio controls. Bluetooth hands-free cellular phone interface system with voice recognition.
  • MR Premium - MR with a 650 watt (max) Rockford Fosgate Navigation/Stereo with 9 speakers.

Evo X Interior

UK models

UK cars kept the Evolution X name.

  • GS - Base Japanese GSR with Enkei wheels, 5-speed manual transmission, Stereo radio/CD with MP3 compatibility and 6 speakers.
  • GSR - GS with HDD navigation with radio and music server (MMCS), Rockford Fosgate premium audio, iPod/MP3 auxiliary input port.
  • GSR SST (FQ-300 only) - GSR FQ-300 with 6-speed TC-SST transmission with SST mode selection (normal, sport, super sport).

Engine options:

  • FQ-300: Engine rated at 217kw at 6500 rpm and 407Nm at 3500 rpm.
  • FQ-330: Engine rated at 242kw at 6500 rpm and 437Nm at 3500 rpm.
  • FQ-360: Engine rated at 264kw at 6500 rpm and 492Nm at 3500 rpm. Carbon fibre front lip spoiler, rear vortex generator, gear knob, hand brake. Front leather Recaro seats.
  • FQ-400: Engine rated at 302kw and 542Nm of torque. It also includes six-piston Alcon calipers, upgraded brakes, revised Turbo, EcuTeK enhanced ECU, revised exhaust with downpipe, larger injectors and 18-inch wheels, a new aero kit that includes additional cooling intakes, vents, a larger air intake in the hood and ducts and a massive diffuser at the rear.

Australian / New Zealand models

Engine rated at 217kw at 6500 rpm and 366Nm at 3500 rpm.

  • GSR - 5 speed manual or 6-speed TC-SST transmission.
  • MR - 6-speed TC-SST transmission. Suspension with Eibach springs and Bilstein struts. 18-inch BBS forged alloy wheels. Xenon High-Intensity Discharge (HID) headlamps. Mitsubishi Multi Communication System.

MRT Power Kits

Like the Evo IX, the Evo X is a wonderfully performing and handling car straight from the showroom floor, however the new 4B11T engine has enormous potential that is suppressed on Australian model cars. In addition, other markets such as the UK can access factory enhanced models such as the FQ-360 which Australia misses out on.

The good news is that MRT has done heaps of work on the Evolution X, largely due to MRT's new Evo X development car that is used to design awesome Power Kits to give the Australian market similar packages to the FQ models available in the UK. All Power Kits use EcuTeK, giving the ability to tune the factory ECU whilst also allowing direct access to factory calibration data, and the ability to use most of the default factory settings whilst just changing those required.

MRT offers two Power Kits using EcuTeK.

MRT Power Kits

  • XA kit: Consists of an EcuTek upgrade for a guaranteed 20kw power increase and up to 18% torque increase over standard.
  • XB kit: Consists of an EcuTek upgrade, full 3" exhaust system from the first OEM turbo collector for a guaranteed 40kw power increase and up to 25% torque increase over standard.
  • XC kit: In development at time of writing - coming soon . . .

Download: Full Power Kit Details for the Evolution X



Credits

Special thanks to TopSpeed and Wikipedia from where much of this article was reproduced from. Other sources include Mitsubishi Secrets, Web Wombat and Strike Engine.